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20121001
20121031
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CNN 1
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
cancer and you you wouldn't die from it. this money that we put in at ucla. they came up with a drug like that. went through phase 1 trial. went through phase 2 trial. it has gang busters doing great. all these -- it is working for all these women. so i'm not allowed to tell the name of the pharmaceutical company but they took our 1 million and turned it into a commitment of 10 190 million. >> mike: wonderful. i hope that our people will go to the website. it is on the screen and find out how to become part of the effort because there is so many people. every family has been touched. every family has been touched. >> they have been touched. >> mike: no exceptions. and if there is ways to help with the research to find cures and better ways to help people through the process, it would be a wonderful gift to millions of americans. thank you. >> thank you very much, governor. >> mike: always a joy to see you and your courage is amazing and inspiring. thank you, noreen. >> mike: before we go tonight, a personal word. last week matt turner the news anchor at little rock's kthb channel 11 which
wouldn't die from it. so, this mean that we put in at ucla, they came up with a drug like that. one through phase one trial and went through phase two trial and gang busters doing great and working for all of these women. not allowed to tell the name of the pharmaceutical company, but they took our one million and turned it into a commitment of 190 million. >> mike: wow. [applause] maureen, i hope that-- and go on the website and find the screen to become part of the effort. because there's so many people. every family has been touched. every. >> you're right, there has been. >> there's no exceptions. if there's ways to help with the research to find cures and better ways to help people through the process, it would be a can you feel gift to millions of americans. thank you. >> thank you, governor. >> mike: always, your courage is amazing. thank you. [applause] >> so, before we go tonight, a personal word. last week, matt turner, the news anchor at little rock's kthb, channel 11 which is the local cbs affiliate in little rock was killed in a car accident south of little rock. he wa
. khai forbath will take his place, recognized as the top kicker while playing for ucla in 2009. forbath kicker is the redskins' 19th kicker in 18 years, the most out of any team in the nfl. >>> yesterday a big honor at the gaylord resort in national harbor. prince george's presented us with a partners for success award. nbc 4's president and general manager jackie bradford accepted the honor. nbc 4 has partnered with prince george's community college several times to organize events like the bluebird blues festival and community sleds. our own aaron gilchrist was the emcee at the event. >> congrats jackie and the team. 6:21. time for weather and traffic on the ones. here's veronica. >>> perfect weather for baseball today or doing anything else outdoors today. we've been trapped with mornings of mist and fog. same deal this rng montmorning. it's going to lift quickly. temperatures throughout the area, look at that. 40s and 50s. 57 degrees in town. we're running some ten degrees higher. the only 30s showing up in winchester, virginia, right now, where it's 39. at the bus stop this morning
schaaply of ucla. margaret knows who these people are. maybe she can tell us a little bit. >> no, i don't. >> we'll look into that and find out what they did. they just won a big prize. a record setting night for aaron rodgers. he threw a career high six touchdown passes last night as green bay handed the houston texans their first loss of the season 42-24. only one team left, the atlanta falcons. the falcons are now a perfect 6-0. the only undid you feeted team. talk about having a nose for the football. check out nfl network reporter ian rapport, a new reporter doing a live sideline report this weekend. you can say he took one for the team. >> all of a sudden there really have been questions about this defense which is ranked 21st. i had an interesting talk with offensive coordinator -- with -- did you guys just see that football? >> i saw it. >> anyway. anyway. >> that's live tv, folks. keeps right on going. hit by a football in the face and delivers the rest of the report. we're on your side, sir. well done. >> that was well done. all right, john, thank you. >>> former senator arlen
academic colleagues at ucla where i've been getting a phd. for the first one i'd like to make, one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others if they have a very traditional review. so essentially, they have this view america's land of opportunity and that all people regardless of backgrounds can succeed. now this is not to say, but they have this even more so and this is how the answer poll questions and how they help explain a lot of there there policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. the scope of this. so these are some signs i took at a washington d.c. tea party protest here by the capital. you often see signs like this. don't spread my wealth. spread my work ethic. stop punishing and rewarding failure. this is all part of a common thing. and for this to make sense, i think we should go for some polling data. i'm going to show you some polling numbers that i've conducted with the recent rupaul that i directed the foundation. why actually had an opportunity to ask americans in general, but also tea partiers about how they perceive the fairness abou
administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in october 2011 he focused on the impact that
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)